Category Archives: Museums & Galleries

Olympus OM-D Photography Playground Berlin 2014

3Destruct by ANTIVJ at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

The Olympus OM-D Photography Playground has made a welcome return to the Opernwerkstätten in Berlin.

Now in its second year the Photography Playground consists of a series of 9 installations from international artists that are intended to be both visually striking and interactive.

Epiphyte Membrane by Philip Beesley at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

Transforma installation at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

AlexandLiane installation at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

My favourite installations were those that I thought encouraged the highest level of involvement from the visitors.

My first encounter with the work of Argentine artist Leandro Erlich was a write-up in the Evening Standard on his work in Dalston commissioned by the Barbican.

His work, Berlin Façade, is ideally suited to the Photography Playground and visitors were thrilled with the chance to seemingly defy gravity.

Close Up of Berlin Facade by Leandro Erlich at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

Photo taken with Olympus EM-10

Berlin Facade by Leandro Erlich at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

Photo taken with Olympus EM-10

The most fascinating work for me though was 3Destruct by ANTIVJ, an art collective comprised of Yannick Jacquet, Jeremie Peeters and Thomas Vaquié.

The installation uses strobe lighting to create an environment that is constantly changing.

3Destruct by ANTIVJ at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

A visitor poses in 3Destruct by ANTIVJ at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

Bright Light of 3Destruct by ANTIVJ at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

Surreal in 3Destruct by ANTIVJ at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

Integral to the Photography Playground concept is the availability of cameras from the Olympus OM-D range for visitors to record their experiences.  The cameras have been moved to the ground floor in front of the entrance making this option much more obvious to the casual visitor.

The cameras are loaned out free of charge but those visitors who do not carry a National Identity card will need to hand over their Passport.  The memory card is yours to take away when you hand the camera back.

Last year, I didn’t have the proper identification so I missed out on the opportunity to try out a camera so this year I was determined to give it a go.

Along with details of the artists and a short explanation of the work there are suggested settings for the Olympus camera in front of each of the installations.

I got to walk around with an EM-10 and was impressed with the camera and the photos I was able to produce in the short time I had it.

Olympus OM-D EM-10

Olympus OM-D EM-10

Love for Transforma at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

Photo taken with Olympus EM-10

Installation at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

Photo taken with Olympus EM-10

AlexandLiane at Olympus Photography Playground Berlin

Photo taken with Olympus EM-10

I would be keen to try out the camera again and would particularly like to explore its WIFI capability, as this could be a great everyday camera for Intstagram, Facebook, Twitter, etc.

The Olympus OM-D Photography Playground Berlin is open daily 11:00 to 19:00 and entrance is free.  You can find more details at the Photography Playground website.

Art in Berlin – A report by Monocle Magazine

Art in Berlin (screenshot from Monocle report)

It’s Gallery Weekend in Berlin – a time when the city’s many galleries showcase art from a broad range of local and international talent – so when better to share this film from Monocle magazine on Art in Berlin.

Berlin is a hotbed of creative talent.

In the 1920s, artists were attracted by the city’s hedonistic nightlife and attitude of acceptance.  During the cold war more still took advantage of the opportunity to avoid conscription by moving to West Berlin.  And after the fall of the wall, cheap rents and the availability of empty buildings for squatting meant artists could survive more easily here.

In this report for Monocle, Kimberly Bradley looks at how the art scene in Berlin is developing and maturing and how the city has a growing reputation as a destination for international gallerists and collectors.

Monocle – Art in Berlin

via: Berlin Film Society // Monocle

Olympus OM-D Photography Playground at the Opernwerkstätten Berlin

Jeongmoon Choi – Drawing in Space at the Olympus OM-D Photography Playground the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

An interactive exhibition is ideally suited to Berlin, a city overflowing with creative people, and that is what Olympus has created with the Olympus OM-D Photography Playground, which opened at the Opernwerkstätten last night.

The Opernwerkstätten, built between 1939 and 1941 with some involvement from Albert Speer, used to house the workshops of Berlin’s many opera companies.  It was here that the sets were built and costumes made.  Visiting during the installation of the new exhibition gave me the opportunity to appreciate the space.

The ceiling at the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

A hook at the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

Außer Betrieb - Fire Alarm at the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

Olympus turned over 7,000 m² of the building to a group of artists to create site-specific installations on the theme ‘Space and Art’.   Between them, Jeongmoon Choi, Martin Butler, Shan Blume, Starstyling, Numen / For Use, Julian Charrière, UnitedVisualArtists, Tim John and Sven Meyer & Kim Pörksen, Speech and Zimoun have created a stimulating playground for the senses.

Visitors are invited to explore the space and document their experiences with the Olympus OM-D camera which can be rented free of charge.  The memory card is removed from the camera when it is returned and can be taken home.

The Olympus OM-D system camera

Photo courtesy of Olympus

Warning: You will need ‘proper’ identification (for those without a National Identity Card, a passport) to borrow one of the cameras.

Unfortunately, my UK Drivers Licence wasn’t acceptable so I can’t tell you any more about the Olympus OM-D, except that it looks good.

It was clear that those people who did get their hands on the camera were enjoying the experience though – everywhere you went people were snapping away.

Visitors taking photos of the installation by Zimoun – Prepared dc-motors, cork balls, cardboard boxes at the Olympus OM-D Photography Playground the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

Visitors having fun with the installation by fashion designing duo Starstyling – Settings at the Olympus OM-D Photography Playground the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

A visitor taking photographs in the installation by SPEECH (Tchoban & Kuznetsov) – towninbox at the Olympus OM-D Photography Playground the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

And why wouldn’t they?  The installations have been cleverly conceived and constructed to play with light, sound and perception and make ideal subjects or backgrounds for photographs.

A visitor taking photographs in Shan Blume's OT_L_Space_01 at the Olympus OM-D Photography Playground the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

 

United Visual Artists – Vanishing point at the Olympus OM-D Photography Playground the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

Amongst my favourite installations was Drawing Space by Korean artist Jeongmoon Choi.  The simple but effective use of UV light and string created a myriad of geometric patterns that were visually striking and different from every angle.

Visitors interacting with the installation by Jeongmoon Choi - Drawing in Space at the Olympus OM-D Photography Playground the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

Another outstanding contribution was Tim John’s ‘Was war gestern’ (What was yesterday).  I spoke to the artist while he was creating the artwork and it was important for him to create an experience with his installation.  Echoing the building’s past he has created a stage and set, complete with audience in their boxes.  A number of ‘pointing fingers’ direct visitors to the interactive elements.  The crank of an old gramophone, for instance, must be turned to start the show.

Tim John – Was war gestern (What was yesterday) at the Olympus OM-D Photography Playground the Opernwerstätten in Berlin

A fun, interactive, sensory experience this is what all exhibitions should be.  The Olympus OM-D Photography Playground has returned in 2014 and is open daily 11:00 to 19:00 at the Opernwerkstätten, Zinnowitzer Strasse 9, Berlin until 25 May 2014 – entry is free.

JR – Wrinkles of the City in Berlin

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 1

French Street Artist JR began his Wrinkles of the City project in Cartegna in 2008 – since then, he has continued the theme in Shanghai, Los Angeles and Havana and this month, Berlin.

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 2

As luck would have it, I spotted JR and his crew at work at Warschauer Strasse two weeks ago today.  Having recognised his work, I followed him on Twitter and Instagram, where he posted shots of work in progress and some of the completed artworks.

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 3

The concept behind Wrinkles of the City is to take photos of the old people living in the city in which the art will be displayed as large-scale paste-ups on walls that have their own texture so that the architectural wrinkles enhance the physical wrinkles.

JR has left his mark on between 15 and 20 walls in Berlin where suitable buildings are plentiful.

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 11

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 4

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 5

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 6

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 7

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 8

While he was here he also created impromptu artwork at the East Side Gallery, where he rebuilt a section of the wall recently removed by developers amid protests and added a paste up.  In this article in Berliner Morgenpost (auf Deutsch) it is alleged that a Security Guard was knocked out during the incident.  A photo of the artwork has subsequently been removed from JR’s intagram feed.

This isn’t JR’s first contribution to Street Art in Berlin.  JR collaborated with BLU on the mural at Cuvrystrasse that represents the struggle for East and West to remove each other’s masks to reveal their true identity, which featured in my BLU in Berlin post.  JR’s input, the eyes, had unfortunately long since disappeared by the time I first came to Berlin in 2009.  There is also a huge pair of eyes under the railway bridge from Friedrichstrasse station at Schiffbauerdamm.

An exhibition of Wrinkles of the City at Galerie Henrink Springmann runs until 25 May 2013, with two of the outdoor pieces nearby.  The exhibition includes original artworks on wood, incredible photos from the project in previous cities, a captivating multi-screen video installation (with blinking eyes) in the front room and a film of JR at work on loop in the back of the gallery.  It really compliments the street work and I would highly recommend a visit.

You can see more photos of JR’s Wrinkles of the City project in Berlin on his website, including photos of the piece on Warschauer Strasse with an uninterrupted view – an advantage of having access to the train tracks (parked trains have been in the way each time I’ve been there).

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 9

Also, for an interview with JR about the project, shot while he completed the work at Postbahnhof, check out this video from Enter Berlin, a YouTube channel dedicated to urban culture, art, food, fashion and music.

Street Artist JR – Wrinkles of the City // On the Beat

I hope to find more of the JR pieces from Wrinkles of the City in Berlin over the coming weeks.  Sooner rather than later hopefully because there is a question over how long some might last – the diggers are already perilously close to this piece.

JR - Wrinkles of the City Berlin 10

Jüdisches Museum Berlin (Jewish Museum Berlin)

The Collegienhaus - the Old Building of the Jewish Museum Berlin

Like Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart (Museum of Contemporary Art), I visited the Jüdisches Museum Berlin (Jewish Museum Berlin) with my first Museum Pass in 2010 and was determined to go back during my Berlin Museum Marathon in February this year.

The Zinc facade of the Libeskind Building of the Jewish Museum Berlin

The Museum is housed in a combination of the Collegienhaus (Old Building), the former Superior Court of Justice for the Kurmark Brandenburg, and the striking and more instantly recognisable zinc façade of the Libeskind Building.

The new building, opened in 2001, is accessible only through a staircase from the Old Building, which it zig-zags away from and the walls are cut through by the irregular shapes of the windows and a series of voids.

A view out of an opening in The Libeskind Building of the Jewish Museum Berlin

A cross shaped opening in The Libeskind Building of the Jewish Museum Berlin

In  2000 Daniel Libeskind said that the museum voids refer to:

that which can never be exhibited when it comes to Jewish Berlin history: Humanity reduced to ashes.

The installation Shalekhet (Fallen Leaves) by Israeli artist Menashe Kadishnman consists of more than 10,000 iron faces, representing the innocent victims of war and violence, that cover the floor of the Memory Void.

Shalekhet (Fallen Leaves) by Israeli artist Menashe Kadishnman in the Memory Void of the Jewish Museum Berlin

The Axis of the Holocaust leads to a heavy door that opens into another of the building’s voids, The Holocaust Tower.  As with all of the voids the walls are bare concrete and the tower is neither air conditioned nor heated.  Natural light enters through a space at the top of the tower.  The combination of these environmental factors creates a peaceful, if slightly disconcerting, atmosphere.

Inside The Holocaust Tower at the end of the Axis of the Holocaust at the Jewish Museum Berlin

At the end of the Axis of Emigration, is the Garden of Exile, a series of 49 concrete stelae, taller than those of the Memorial To The Murdered Jews of Europe, but similarly arranged in a regular pattern on sloping ground.  Here, the stelae are filled with earth and trees grow from them.  The same disorienting effect results.

The Garden of Exile at the end of The Axis of Emigration at the Jewish Museum Berlin

The Axis of Continuity leads to a staircase and the exhibition space above, where the permanent exhibits present two millennia of German Jewish History.

Paintings on display as part of the permanent exhibition at the Jewish Museum Berlin

Silver on display as part of the permanent exhibition at the Jewish Museum Berlin

Yellow fabric with Jewish Stars by Geitel & Co at Jewish Museum Berlin

Inevitably some of the most notable and heartbreaking exhibits are holocaust related.  The museum has the following explanation of the yellow star:

Beginning in September 1941, all Jews were required to wear a yellow star: “Jews six years of age and older are prohibited from appearing in public without a Jewish star…It is to be worn visibly on the left side of the breast, firmly sewn to the clothing.”

The stars were manufactured by the Berlin flag maker Geitel & Co.  Great lengths of cloth were stored on the premises of the Gestapo-controlled “National Union of Jews in Germany”.  For a processing fee of 10 pfennig, the Jews had to purchase the yellow star and sew it to their clothing.

For more information about the Jüdisches Museum Berlin (Jewish Museum Berlin), including opening hours and prices see their website.

Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart (Museum of Contemporary Art)

Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart (Museum for Contemporary Art) in Berlin

The Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart (Museum of Contemporary Art) in Berlin was the first venue I visited with my first Museum Pass in 2010 so it seemed appropriate that it should be the first stop on my Berlin Museum Marathon.

At the beginning of February I used the Museum Pass my work colleagues bought for me when I left my job in London in 2011 and was determined to see as many of Berlin’s wonderful museums and galleries as I possibly could in three days.

As well as that first visit in 2010, I also went to Hamburger Bahnhof during my second Berlin holiday in 2011 and I enjoyed both visits so much that I was determined to go back.

The Hamburger Bahnhof was originally built in the mid 19th century as the terminus of the Berlin to Hamburg railway but was too small for its purpose by 1906 when it first became a museum of traffic and technology.

Since 1996 the The Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart has housed the Contemporary Art collection of the Nationalgalerie.

As it is necessary to leave all bags and rucksacks in the cloakroom in the East Wing of the museum, it was here that I started my tour of the collections.

East Wing

The East Wing of the Hamburger Bahnhof houses the Marx Collection, which formed the backbone of the museum when it opened in 1996.  On display currently are the large-scale photographs of Thomas Struth and Andreas Gursky.  I have been a fan of Gursky’s incredibly detailed photographs since a friend introduced me to his work when I first took up photography.

Andreas Gursky – Singapore Stock Exchange and Library (Bibliothek) - at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart

Andreas Gursky – Singapore Stock Exchange (1997) and Library (Bibliothek) (1999)

Also in the East Wing of the building, the Kleihueshalle (named after Josef Paul Kleihues – the architect responsible for the transformation of the building into an art museum) is home to more of the Marx Collection including works by Anselm Kiefer and Andy Warhol.

Anselm Kiefer - Mohn und Gedächtnis - at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart

Detail from Anselm Kiefer – Mohn und Gedächtnis (1989)

Andy Warhol - Mao - at Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart

Andy Warhol – Mao (1973)

In 2010 I remember seeing Andy Warhol’s Double Elvis here but that was on display in the Neue Nationalgalerie this year.

West Wing

The West Wing includes an impressive selection of work by Joseph Beuys and my favourite artwork from this visit The Artwork Nobody Knows by Ryan Gander, which reminded me of the Street Art of Slinkachu due to its small scale.

Joseph Beuys Das Ende des 20. Jahrhunderts - at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart

Joseph Beuys – Das Ende des 20. Jahrhunderts (1982-83)

Ryan Gander - The Artwork Nobody Knows - at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart

Ryan Gander – The Artwork Nobody Knows (2011)

It was also in the West Wing, upstairs that time, that I saw my favourite artwork in 2010.  Schattenspiel (Shadow Play) by Hans-Peter Feldman was a captivating projection of shadows created by a moving array of toys.

Hans-Peter Feldman - Schattenspiel - at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart

Hans-Peter Feldman – Schattenspiel

Historic Hall

It was great to see a large group of children engaging with Martin Honert’s Kinderkreuzung (Children’s Crusade) in the Historic Hall, a large vaulted space immediately forward of the entrance.

Martin Honert - Kinderkreuzung - at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart

Martin Honert – Kinderkreuzung

On my second visit to the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum für Gegenwart in 2011, it was here that I saw an exhibition of the works of Richard Long including his Berlin Circle and River Avon Mud Circle

Rieckhallen

During my latest visit the Rieckhallen, a former warehouse that has been connected to the museum since 2004, was closed but in 2010, it was here that I saw Clown Torture (2010), a video installation by Bruce Nauman.

Bruce Nauman – Clown Torture - at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart

Bruce Nauman – Clown Torture (2010)

I have now been to the Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart (Museum of Contemporary Art) in Berlin three times. Each time I have seen new artworks, beautifully presented and I’m already looking forward to my next visit.

Berlin Museum Marathon – Making The Most of a 3-Day Museum Pass

Berlin Museum Pass and Tickets

When I left my job in London to move to Berlin my colleagues made a collection and bought me The Berlin Pass, which includes a 3-Day Berlin Museum Pass.

Bought separately, the Museum Pass costs €19 and with it you get free entry to 55 of Berlin’s best museums and galleries.

Last week, I finally felt that I had the time and the energy needed to make the most out of it and, having drawn up an itinerary the night before, I set out on Tuesday to visit as many of the qualifying museums and galleries as possible.

Day 1

Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart (Museum of Contemporary Art) in Berlin

Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart (Museum of Contemporary Art)*

Berliner Medizinhistorisches Museum der Charité
 (Berlin Museum of Medical History at the Charité)

Gemäldegalerie (Old Masters Paintings)

Musikinstrumenten-Museum (Musical Instrument Museum)

Neue Nationalgalerie (New National Gallery)*

Had they been open I would also have visited the Kupferstischkabinett (Museum of Prints and Drawings) and revisited the Kunstgewerbemuseum (Museum of Decorative Arts) whilst I was at the Kulturforum.

Day 2

Jewish Museum Berlin - Memory Void

Jüdisches Museum Berlin (Jewish Museum Berlin)*

Deutsches Technikmuseum (German Museum of Technology)

Altes Museum (Museum of the Ancient World)

I had much more planned for Day 2 but hadn’t grasped just how big the Deutsches Technikmuseum is.

Day 3

Allied Museum Berlin - Spy Tunnel

Alliierten Museum (Allied Museum)

Brücke Museum

Sammlung Scharf-Gerstenberg (Scharf-Gerstenberg Collection)

Alte Nationalgalerie (Old National Gallery)

I would also have revisited the Neues Museum (New Museum) whilst I was on Museumsinsel but there was a €4 entry fee, as there was a temporary exhibition.

A 3-Day Museum Pass costs €19 and in 3 days the combined total of the standard entrance prices to all the museums and galleries I visited was €87.  That said, I wouldn’t recommend that everyone tries to see 12 different venues with their pass.

When I decided to use my pass in this way I knew that I wouldn’t be able to spend as much time as I would like in the museums that appealed to me but I wanted to sample as many as possible and then return to my favourites at a late date.

Also, I was revisiting some (marked with *) for the sake of taking more photographs and checking for any changes since I had last been.

Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin

It’s also worth pointing out that at the end of each day my feet felt the way they used to during my holidays in Berlin when I would sit on the edge of the bath with an icy cold beer in my hand and my feet in cool water until the throbbing stopped.

In the coming weeks I will post about my favourite venues that I visited during my Berlin Museum Pass Marathon.

The 3-Day Berlin Museum Pass is available from the participating museums and galleries and Berlin’s Visitor Information Centres or can be ordered online from visitBerlin.  There is also a list of the 55 museums and galleries the Museum Pass gives you access to on the visitBerlin website.

Berlinische Galerie: The Shuttered Society. Art Photography in the GDR 1949-1989 (Video)

Berlinische Galerie - The Shuttered Society. Art Photography in the GDR 1949-1989 (screen shot from the official YouTube Video)

The Berlinische Galerie, Berlin’s Museum of Modern Art, Photography and Architecture, has posted the video Berlinische Galerie: The Shuttered Society. Art Photography in the GDR 1949-1989 on its YouTube channel.

As stated in the ‘About’ section of the video on YouTube:

The Berlinische Galerie is to stage the world’s first comprehensive exhibition of art photography in the GDR. Twenty years after the Wall, “The Shuttered Society” identifies traditions and trends while illustrating shifts in visual idiom and theme.

I think it’s great that this video has been posted because it acts an advert, a companion to the exhibition and an opportunity for those unable to visit Berlin or the gallery to see some interesting and important photographs.

The exhibition runs until 28 January 2013.  Admission is €8.  For further details see the Berlinische Galerie website.

Tip: Whilst no longer an option for this particular exhibition, admission to the Berlinische Galerie is half price on the first Monday of each month.

Berlinische Galerie: The Shuttered Society. Art Photography in the GDR 1949-1989

Stattmarkt Berlin – An Alternative Christmas Market

Spray Cans from I'm Colors You Inkdians! - Art by Mein Lieber Prost at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Berlin has a plethora of Christmas Markets (Weihnachtsmärkte) but one market this month offers an alternative to the usual glut of Glühwein stands, Crépes sellers and Christmas gift stalls – so if you’ve had a kitsch overload head to Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding.

The Stattbad is a former public baths (Stadtbad) and the Stattmarkt makes clever use of the building’s past – the tiled walls lend themselves to making the most of colourful artwork and there is a light installation by Markus May and Moritz Arnold in the deep end of the pool.

Art by Doppledenk and Light Installation by Matkus May & Moritz Arnold at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Climbing the stairs from the ground floor to the first floor, with its balcony overlooking the pool, there is a particularly striking piece – I’m Colors, You Inkdians! by Mein Lieber Prost.

I'm Colors You Inkdians! - Art by Mein Lieber Prost at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Works by $askia (Saskia Hahn) and Emess also caught my eye.

All Seeing Monkey - Art by $askia at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Art by Emess at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Still on the first floor, in what appears to be the former changing rooms, was a space curated by Open Walls Itinerant Gallery, who also exhibited at Stroke Urban Art Fair in the summer.

The gallery represents an impressive roster of artists including: Prost, YZ, BR1, Vermibus and ALIAS.

nsd 057 - Art by BR1 at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

nsd 049, nsd 052, nsd 053 - Art by BR1 at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Painful Past and Bitter Swig - Art by Vermibus at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Lost By The Sea - Art by ALIAS at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Descending the stairs, I couldn’t resist stopping to take a snap of a hairdryer, a remnant of the building’s past life.

A hairdryer at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

It was back on the ground floor that I found my favourite part of the exhibition.  Entering what seemed to be the bowels of the building, with uneven floors and exposed pipework, I encountered artworks and installations perfectly matched to their surroundings.

Postmodernist Deconstructionism - Art by Anton Unai at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Art by Unknown Artist at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Sitting - Art by ALIAS at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

And in my final room, I discovered my star of the show – KEN (aka Plotterroboter).  His installation, Behind The Mask, and accompanying paintings were all cleverly executed and artfully lit.

Crouch - Art by KEN (aka Plotterroboter) at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Behind The Mask - Art by KEN (aka Plotterroboter) at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Emergency - Art by KEN (aka Plotterroboter) at Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

If I’ve failed to convince you to visit, check out this trailer by Markus Küpper, which ALIAS posted on his Facebook page and led to my visit:

So, this December in Berlin, make the most of the traditional Christmas Markets on offer but take some time to seek out the unusual at the Stattmarkt at Stattbad Wedding.

Location, Opening Times and Prices

Stattbad Wedding (Gerichtstrasse 65) – nearest station: S + U Wedding.

Fri 7 to Sun 9 December and Thu 13 to Sun 16 December: 1200 – 1900.

€5 (€3 concessions).

Robert Montgomery – Echoes of Voices in the High Towers Part 2

Echoes of Voices in the High Towers - Robert Montgomery at the Echoes of Voices in the High Towers show at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Robert Montgomery’s billboard installations for his Echoes of Voices in the High Towers exhibition have to be one of the more unique Street Art styles that I have seen in my time in Berlin.

Ironically, Robert Montgomery is British but it wasn’t until I came to Berlin that I got to see any of his work.

I first saw his billboards and light installations in Berlin in the summer and then read about a show at Stattbad Wedding and more billboards in the pipeline on the Neue Berliner Räume website.

I went to Stattbad Wedding a couple of weeks ago to see the show there.  Here are a few of the pieces.

One Of Those Dreams - Robert Montgomery Sign at the Echoes of Voices in the High Towers show at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

it's You With Your Hands Upside Down - Robert Montgomery at the Echoes of Voices in the High Towers show at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

All Palaces Are Temporary Palaces - Robert Montgomery light installation at the Echoes of Voices in the High Towers show at Stattbad Wedding in Berlin

Unfortunately, I didn’t get to see all 20 billboards that accompanied the show but here are the ones I did see.  There were 4 on Yorckstrasse, which I saw on the way to Viktoriapark with Luci of In a Berlin Minute, who was shooting a video there.

It's You With Your Hands Upside Down - Robert Montgomery Billboard on Yorckstrasse as part of Echoes of Voices in the High Towers in Berlin

A Smile Folded Inside - Robert Montgomery Billboard on Yorckstrasse as part of Echoes of Voices in the High Towers in Berlin

All The Houses I've Lived In - Robert Montgomery Billboard on Yorckstrasse as part of Echoes of Voices in the High Towers in Berlin

All The Songs I Sent You - Robert Montgomery Billboard on Yorckstrasse as part of Echoes of Voices in the High Towers in Berlin

Another 3 on Görlitzer Strasse, which runs alongside Görlitzer Park in Kreuzberg.

Digital>> The Way You Actually See Things - Robert Montgomery Billboard on Görlitzer Strasse as part of Echoes of Voices in the High Towers in Berlin

Looking Back - Robert Montgomery Billboard on Görlitzer Strasse as part of Echoes of Voices in the High Towers in Berlin

he City Has A Brown Sky - Robert Montgomery Billboard on Görlitzer Strasse as part of Echoes of Voices in the High Towers in Berlin

And finally, 1 on Kreuzbergstrasse.

Here Comes What You Get For Your Easy Friendships - Robert Montgomery Billboard on Kreuzbergstrasse as part of Echoes of Voices in the High Towers in Berlin

Whilst I enjoyed the Echoes of Voices in the High Towers show at Stattbad Wedding, for me, Robert Montgomery’s work is at its best out on the streets.  My personal highlight was seeing the light installations at Tempelhofer Park at dusk.