Stolpersteine

If you want to know more about Stolpersteine you can read my first post about these memorials to the victims of National Socialism created by artist Gunter Demnig.

These are the Stolpersteine that I have stumbled across so far.  Click on an image to launch the gallery in a light box:

8 thoughts on “Stolpersteine

  1. strawberryjamntoast

    Really interesting post. The sheer number that you’ve ‘stumbled upon’ and the fact that such commemorations are the tip of the iceberg adds the the impact of each small and individual monument. Thanks for bringing these to greater attention.

    Reply
    1. andBerlin

      Thank you. I really think that these are the most powerful of all the monuments that I have seen. The fact that you won’t always see them unless you are conscious of your surroundings is one reason they are so effective.

      Reply
  2. notmsparker

    This is a great idea that you had here – first of all, because so many people simply do not know what these are and secondly, because they are strewn all over this city like glass shards. They make you top in your tracks and they hurt.
    I didn´t realise that anyone can have a Stolperstein laid – if you know of someone whose memory you´d like to honour in this way, you can contact an organisation that makes them. After I heard (or rather read) of a little boy in Erkelenzdamm 9 (then Hoffmanndamm), Berlin Eisenstädt, who was sent to Auschwitz a week after his second birthday, I asked them to do it for him. I hope to see the stone in front of his house soon.

    Reply
  3. berlioz1935

    I have taken a few photos of Stolpersteine myself since coming to Berlin for a sentimental visit (probably for the last time). They are telling us stories about the fate of those people. I’m surprised, and happy, that so many foreign born persons take such an interest in Berlin’s history. Berliners, generally, seem to be blasé about it.

    Reply
    1. andBerlin

      I was drawn to Berlin by its Street Art scene but its history is certainly one of the reasons why I fell in love with the city. There is always something new to discover and to try to understand and Stolpersteine seem like a great way to memorialise the victims of the holocaust on an individual basis. For me, they are the perfect way to honour the dead.

      Reply
  4. ron

    We found some Stolpersteine on a visit to Berlin a couple of years ago – since then we’ve been back to Eastern Europe on a couple of occasions and as someone interested in memorialisation I have been deeply moved by just how many (there are now 40000+) , how varied, how widespread and how poignant these tiny spaces are – these voids of lives that could and should have been.

    Reply

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